Gregory Kiselev: Monographs & Articles

RU

EN

Articles

"Crisis of Our Time" as a Problem of Man // Voprosy filosofii. 1999, № 1.

The Contemporary World and the "New" Religious Consciousness // Voprosy filosofii. 2000, № 6.

Postmodern and Christianity // Voprosy filosofii. 2001, № 12.

New Religiousness as a Problem of Consciousness // Voprosy filosofii. 2002, № 5.

What is the Idea and Importance of Liberal Reforms in Russia? // Vestnik. № 17 (354). August 18. 2004.

The Chance for Freedom (Perspectives of an Open Society) // Voprosy filosofii. 2004, № 9.

Freedom and Evolution // Voprosy filosofii.2005, № 10.

Ideas and Values of a New Era // Voprosy filosofii. 2006, № 4.

The Human World: Deadlock of Evolution? // Voprosy filosofii. 2007, № 4.

"In God’s Image and Likeness" // Voprosy filosofii. 2008, № 1.

"Mystery of Progress" and the Possibility of History // Voprosy filosofii. 2009, № 2.

"The Second Universe": Drama of Freedom // Voprosy filosofii. 2010, № 2.

In his article G.S. Kiselev suggests we consider history as a process of "humanizing" the natural world, of creating the "human world" or the "Second Universe". This process is conditioned by an esoteric dichotomy, the soul-body essence of an individual and its corollary the constant metamorphosis, the fashioning of self from a "possible man" to the "man realized". One can fashion self through a concerted application of will, i.e, through a holistic, conscious moral and intellectual effort. This effort enables the individual to enter a specifically human realm of consciousness, which also remains by definition supra-natural. That's how one reaches the state of being, which is an artificial condition, brought about by the man through a mediation of symbols, primarily of a religious kind. An objectification of the constituent elements of being creates culture, which, in its turn, serves to "humanize" the civilization. The author pays particular attention to the range of possibilities underlying the "human world" and resulting from the fact that the man stays free and thus liable to reject the fashioning of self, denying his being and consciousness for the sake of existence "outside of history". This circumstance, in his opinion, accounts for the relative nature of social progress as experienced in the past as well as in our own day.

Religious Meanings of the Human World // Voprosy filosofii. 2011, № 5.

G. Kiselev's article is an attempt to extend his research in the field that could be called "man and his world as a supernatural phenomenon". The author has already published several works on this subject in "Voprosy filosofii". In this article G.Kiselev examins Christianity. While reminding of its complexity and paradoxicality, he advocates the proposition that Christianity is much broader than the traditional church beliefs. Since it is Christ's moral teaching that is the center of Christianity, it should not be examined without regard to the socalled "Christian anthropocentrism". In order to substantiate this propostion G. Kiselev not only interprets the Trinitarian doctrine as an evidence, but also draws a concept of consciousness as a paradoxical sphere where the real man is being created by means of self-creation with the help of supernatural symbols.

History and It’s Similarity // Voprosy filosofii. 2012, № 3.

In this article G.S. Kiselev raises and substantiates the idea of history's dual nature. He argues for the dual character of humans: their life reflects both natural and supernatural at the same time. History may be regarded as the emergence of human world, which is built over nature and which repudiates some of its laws. The process by which this world is formed is characterized by intermittence, unevenness, periods of stagnation and even regression. During such periods the human world is not reproduced: life is deprived of truly human content. The author refers to these periods as "quasihistory" i.e. something like history. The conclusion is that it is this "quasihistory" that gives us a chance to elaborate an adequate approach to the Christian eschatological idea of progress.

Mysterious Homeland // Voprosy filosofii. 2013, № 4.

G.S. Kiselev's article describes the possibilities that emerge in the modern world for the certain convergence of philosophy and Christianity. These possibilities are conditioned by the objective necessity of a socalled "anthropocentric turnaround". Without this turnaround it is difficult for Christianity to reveal its verity for a person in of the Twentyfirst century. On the other hand, this convergence is also conditioned by the trend of modem philosophy which admits the existence of the supernatural side of man, a philosophy that develops the theory of mind as a sphere, or a continuous space, where a "probable man" is turning into an "actual man". (For other works of the author see http://www.gskiselev.com.).

History as Being // Voprosy filosofii. 2014, № 4.

This article by Gregory S. Kiselev deals with the philosophical approach to the concept of history. It is argued here that the philosophical approach is possible only when consciousness is regarded as an individual's extreme volitional moral and intellectual effort. The result of this effort is the formation of a trans-subject interpersonal sphere that gives birth to what philosophy determines as existence. It is in this state of existence that an individual is creating history, and through this state of existence the individual brings sense into life. Without consciousness there is no existence and thus no history, and only senseless movement in a circle is possible.

The Illusion of Progress // Voprosy filosofii. 2015, № 4.

In this article Gregory S. Kiselev examines the validity of the idea of social progress, as well as perspectives on the future of humankind. The author argues that this idea demands a serious reconsideration: in some spheres progress does exist, but in the others there is clear regression and even archaism. The modem world is full of conflicts social, sociocultural and civilizational, and the means of their resolution are still not apparent. At the same time there is a new anthropological reality that provides witness to significant changes in the nature of the human being. In author's view this points to the extreme uncertainty of mankind's perspectives.

Where Did We Finally Bring Ourselves To? (unpublished manuscript)

The Way to Talk About the Meaning of History // Voprosy filosofii. 2016, № 5.

The conceptualization of "history" in the sphere of philosophy may differ from that prevailing in the other humanities. The difference arises from the assumption, common among philosophers, that Homo sapiens has both natural and supernatural aspects. An individual becomes a true human being only to the extent that his supernatural aspect orders and defines his life and that of the surrounding world, thereby endowing existence with meanings. The term history can be properly applied only to those brief periods in the story of humankind that have been marked by the emergence of such meanings in the evident humanization (ensoulment) of the world. Because the continuum of meaningless existence has been only intermittently disrupted by such periods, the author rejects the notion of social progress as the objective advancement of society toward some superior state. The philosophical conceptualization of history leads inevitably to recognition of its probabilistic nature and, consequently, the uncertainty of its demise.

Christianity as a Problem // Voprosy filosofii, 2018

The author suggests that Christianity is essentially a problem – inasmuch as it is present in the life of any person because individual life represents a state of being. This view is rooted in Christianity’s unique Trinitarian nature. On the one hand, this peculiarity allows to de-mythologize the fundamental Christian ideas and thus enable a dialogue between Christianity and the modern man. On the other hand, the Trinitarian nature of Christianity provides for a possibility of its historical transformation into the Kantian "religion of reason" – a religious phenomenon that defies the traditional understanding of "religion." Philosophy of consciousness, as articulated by the philosopher M. Mamardashvili, may explain this change. G. S. Kiselev embraces the view of probabilistic historical development, which questions the feasibility of issuing unequivocal judgements about the future. That is why the transformation of the historical forms of Christianity appears to be problematic – as it ultimately depends on the person’s free will. Philosophy of consciousness envisions а realization of the tautological basis of being, which could become a foundation for the creation of a humanistic social reality. However, according to G. S. Kiselev, our modern civilization is defined by such phenomena as the appearance of the "mass man," who exists entirely outside of consciousness, as well as the deepening divisions between the "rich North" and the "impoverished South" – one of the causes, for example, of the emergence of Islamic terrorism. As such this civilization is moving further away from the historical being and does not generate the necessary precondition for the creation of a humanistic civilization.